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About bamboo tops, a Tencel Wattle Skirt and a Juniper Cardigan

Posted by Maaike Baudry on

Juniper Cardigan and Wattle skirt

I don't get around to blogging that much anymore so I'm going to take this opportunity to share three makes in one!

I made this Wattle skirt (a pattern by Megan Nielsen) back in August, and I've already had quite a lot of wear out of it. The Tencel Twill is the perfect fabric for this pattern as it has a good amount of weight and drape.

I've already made a second one (see my previous blog post). I made a size 8 and adjusted the length to fall on my knee.

wattle skirt

I wore this blue skirt at the Melbourne Frocktails party last weekend and I have not ironed it since then (although it's due for a wash!). One of the many advantages of a Tencel fabric is that it is less prone to wrinkling than say cotton or linen. Is it wrinkle-free? No, but I can get away with not ironing after each wear.

Juniper cardigan in bamboo jersey

I also made a Juniper cardigan in bamboo jersey. I used the heavy bamboo which is more suited to this as it is a bit thicker. Black is really hard to photograph but here you can see the lines in the sleeve design.  

The cardigan is pretty easy to sew, but due to the curves, I did baste most seams on my sewing machine first, to then finish them off on my overlocker.

I made a size 10 with the only modification of adding 4 cm in length to this cropped version (I do this with all tops). I also determined the button placement after trying it on, instead of using the marks on the pattern. 

The fit isn't perfect around the bust but good enough. I've already made three! 

Juniper cardigan in bamboo jersey

A blue skirt can be combined with a lot of colours of course, so I'm rapidly creating a collection of bamboo tops in different colours.

Aberdeen top in bamboo jersey

The pink top is the Aberdeen by Colette Patterns, also in bamboo jersey (colour peach). I must admit sewing a V-neck in a drapey bamboo is not for the faint-hearted. Definitely use some knit interfacing at the V before attempting it.

Aberdeen top

I love the colour and design of this top, but not sure if a batwing sleeve really suits me. It does have a nice V-shape at the back as well, just don't burn your neck in another top first like I did!

This modeling is not getting any less awkward. The sunglasses certainly help and why not pretend something is about to jump at me from a tree?

 Same modeling strategy with the green top (pattern Idyllwild by Itch to Stitch).

Wattle skirt and Idyllwild topOr how about holding onto the skirt while looking into the distance! :)

Till next time!

x

Maaike


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3 comments

  • It was lovely to see you at Frocktails. Gorgeous outfit and perfectly practical too. Your modelling is a perfect example of a new Australian who has been warned to watch out for drop bears!

    Lightning McStitch on
  • Hi Bernice! I’ve made Tencel pants with Maaidesign fabric too (a few blog posts back).

    After a wash, I like to get in quickly to the wet stuff, give the pants some really hard flicks (to work out the easy creases) and hang them up to dry on a pants coat hanger. I find that this process means only a small ironing job is necessary. If I’m feeling REALLY lazy I toss the pants in the dryer on a warm setting to finish off the drying process and then hang them straight up when the machine ‘dings’ at me. Then I don’t bother to iron at all!

    Hope this helps!

    Rosey Huf on
  • I bought the tencil twill. I made a pair of trousers that are great until you wash them. Then it is a major job to iron them out. what have you found?

    Bernice Bristow on

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